Plumeria – Cutting, Rooted or Grafted

When looking for plumeria it helps to know what to look for and what to expect if you are getting a plumeria cutting, a rooted Plumeria or a grafted Plumeria.

A Plumeria Cutting is the tip of a branch cut from a donor plumeria, usually about 10″-18″ long depending on the donor plumeria growing habit. Cuttings do not have roots, but have been allowed to callus (callusing allow the cutting to form a tissue that allows roots to grow) Cutting are sold only in the Spring and Summer months. Cutting make specifically for grafting are called scion and are 6″-10″ long depending on the donor plumeria. A plumeria cutting will eventually have to be rooted for it to survive.

A Rooted Plumeria is a plumeria cutting that has been allowed to grow its own root system. For plumeria cutting to form root will take 6-8 weeks under ideal conditions or may take many months. Rooted plants should be allowed to grow roots for at least 4 months prior to winter.

A Grafted Plumeria is a plumeria cutting (scion) that has been grafted to an already mature root system (rootstock). It take about 3 week after grafting before it is ready to ship. Grafted plants are grafted to root systems approximately 18 to 24 months old, depending on the diameter of the Cutting.

Plumeria Species

Accepted species

  1. Plumeria alba L. – Puerto Rico, Lesser Antilles
  2. Plumeria clusioides Griseb. (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa L.) – Cuba
  3. Plumeria cubensis Urb. (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa L.) – Cuba
  4. Plumeria ekmanii Urb. (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa L.) – Cuba
  5. Plumeria emarginata Griseb. (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa L.) – Cuba
  6. Plumeria filifolia Griseb. – Cuba
  7. Plumeria inodora Jacq. – Guyana, Colombia, Venezuela (incl Venezuelan islands in Caribbean)
  8. Plumeria krugii Urb. (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa L.) – Puerto Rico
  9. Plumeria lanata Britton (a synonym of Plumeria obtusa var. sericifolia (C.Wright ex Griseb.) Woodson) – Cuba
  10. Plumeria magna Zanoni & M.M.Mejía – Dominican Republic
  11. Plumeria montana Britton & P.Wilson (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa L.) – Cuba
  12. Plumeria obtusa L. – West Indies including Bahamas; southern Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Florida; naturalized in China
  13. Plumeria pudica Jacq. – Panama, Colombia, Venezuela (incl Venezuelan islands in Caribbean)
  14. Plumeria rubra L. – Mexico, Central America, Venezuela; naturalized in China, the Himalayas, West Indies, South America, and numerous oceanic islands
  15. Plumeria sericifolia C.Wright ex Griseb. (now demoted to Plumeria obtusa var. sericifolia (C.Wright ex Griseb.) Woodson) – Cuba
  16. Plumeria × stenopetala Urb.
  17. Plumeria × stenophylla Urb. – Mexico and Central America
  18. Plumeria subsessilis A.DC. – Hispaniola
  19. Plumeria trinitensis Britton (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa var. sericifolia (C.Wright ex Griseb.) Woodson) – Cuba
  20. Plumeria tuberculata G.Lodd. (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa var. sericifolia (C.Wright ex Griseb.) Woodson) – Hispaniola, Bahamas
  21. Plumeria venosa Britton (now a synonym of Plumeria obtusa L.) – Cuba

Elizabeth Thornton’s Plumeria Introductions

Firecracker

Lemon Drop

Mardi Gras

Mauve

Maverick

Texas Aggie

Texas Fiesta

Texas Star


 

The following table is a summary of the information presented in a color booklet cataloging the Plumeria Cultivars produced by Elizabeth Thornton.

Key:

  • Number = The line number of the cultivar described.
  • Name = The Cultivar Name given to the cultivar described.
  • Floret Size = The diameter in inches of individual florets on the cultivar described.
  • Inflorescence No. = Number of individual florets open on a given inflorescence after the initial flush of blooming.
  • Fragrance = The dominant fragrance imparted by the flower cluster.
The Exotic Plumeria (Frangipani)

A catalog of Plumeria cultivars grown from seed by the Thornton family – Elizabeth, Sharon and Bruce Thornton, and Bette and Jerry Gips, in Houston, Texas 1979-1994. Of 700 seedlings these new varieties have been named because they have proved to be superior. Cuttings of these cultivars have been widely shared with growers in Texas, California, Florida, Kansas, Hawaii, India, Mexico and Kenya.

NumberNameFloret size (in.)Inflorescence No.Fragrance 
1Symphony3 3/46 to 9Sweet 
2Mardi Gras35 to 7Peach 
3Texas Fiesta3 1/2 – 48 to 10Sweet 
4Yellow Rose of Texas36 to 8Nasturtium
5Lavender3 1/2 – 48 to 10Grape
6Snow White4 1/2 – 53 to 5Citrus
7Maverick44 to 7Sweet
8Pink Perfection44 to 7Sweet
9Celebration3 1/25 to 8Citrus
10Sunshine3+5 to 7Lemon
11Angela3 1/28 to 10Sweet
12Texas Star3+8 to 10Citrus
13Rose Red Too4 1/24 to 6Rose
14Courtade Gold4 1/24 to 6Sweet
15Texas Beauty3 1/25 to 7Citrus
16Peaches3 1/24 to 7Peach
17Lemon Drop3 1/28 to 10Lemon
184th of July5 1/24 to 6Spicy
19Mellow Yellow36 to 8Sweet
20Firecracker3 1/24 to 7Spicy
21Texas Sunset3+4 to 6Fruity
22Courtade Lemon3 3/45 to 7Citrus
23Gold Cup3 1/23 to 5Citrus
24Pink Parfait4+5 to 7Citrus
25Gold Dust3+6 to 8Citrus
26Thanksgiving48 to 10Citrus
27Mauve4 1/25 to 8Fruity
28Pina Colado3 1/2 – 48 to 10Coconut
29Jubilee3 3/44 to 6Rose
30Moon Glow45 to 7Citrus
31Lemon Parfait3 3/45 to 8Citrus
32Elegance5 1/23 to 5Sweet
33Memo’s Gold3 1/24 to 6Fruity
34Cherry Parfait3 1/2 – 44 to 7Fruity
35Painted Desert3 1/28 to 10Sweet
36Honeysuckle3 1/2 – 44 to 6Honeysuckle
37Raspberry Parfait3 1/24 to 6Fruity
38Peppermint3 3/43 to 5Mint
39Raspberry3 3/43 to 5Raspberry
40Texas Aggie36 to 8Fruity